Tag Archives: state-affiliated threat actors

Spies in the Middle East: Israeli Cyber Operations

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The State of Israel has developed exceptional cyber capabilities that surpass all other nations within the MENA region. In January 2017, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared that Israel had become one of the top five global cyber powers. Israel conducts covert cyber operations that are strictly classified and rarely formally acknowledged. So, beyond the infamous Stuxnet virus, what do publicly available sources reveal about state-sponsored hackers within Israel?

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Horizon Scanning: Hacktivism

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Our historical understanding of protest as a means of political upheaval tends to be rooted in the idea of direct conflict between two clearly defined agendas or ideologies – between grassroots activism and state apparatus, for instance. We imagine crowds marching and holding placards, voicing their dissent in unison.

However, as we become increasingly interconnected and conduct more of our lives online, technology is changing our conceptions of protest and direct action altogether.

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The dark reality of cyberspace: the case of CVE-2017-0199

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Threat actors do not exist in a cyber vacuum. Hackers, organised criminal gangs, and nation states all operate within the same cyberspace and have access to the same systems and vulnerabilities. Whilst the tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) vary between different threat actor categories (in  terms of method, capability and sophistication), the infection vectors they target remain the same.

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Russia's Cyber Profile

A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma: an analysis of Russia’s cyber profile

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In today’s geopolitical arena, battles are increasingly fought with bits instead of bullets, and bots instead of soldiers. While these covert operations largely remain behind the scenes, the result is often felt as an aftershock by the public. The list of casualties, which includes some of the biggest names in financial services, technology, defence and government, is growing exponentially. And to further blur the already murky waters surrounding the issue of attribution in cyber warfare, nation state actors aiming to achieve a degree of deniability now often employ proxies to engage in cyber espionage campaigns.

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