Tag Archives: Russia

Politics aside, what we can learn from the DOJ’s indictment of 12 Russian officers

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On the 16th July, the Department of Justice indicted 12 Russian nationals for their role in the cyber operations against the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the Democratic National Committee (DNC). It was the latest in a series of private sector and government publications that provide proof tying Russian hackers to the breaches of Democrat Party institutions and the theft of confidential information.

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everyone hacks everyone

Everyone Hacks Everyone

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If you examine the history of cyber breaches, you will find that the most newsworthy are usually attributed to Russia, China, Iran, and more recently North Korea. This may, or may not be true, but to echo the words of Eugene Kaspersky: the reality is that everyone hacks everyone. Friends attack foes, but friends also attack friends… secretly of course.

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Regional Conflict and the Establishment of Cyber Warfare Testing Grounds

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Regional conflict almost invariably brings with it consequences beyond its initial cause. The surrounding countries and regions suffer in a multitude of ways – from the massive and immediate human misery to ongoing political, economic and civil instability, and more long term diplomatic tensions and wounds that take time to heal.

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Election Hacking: an old threat in new clothes

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There is a general consensus that Russia interfered in the 2016 US Presidential Elections. According to the US intelligence community, it has been assessed with ‘high confidence’ that Russia used nation state proxy groups to influence the outcome of the presidential election in favour of Donald Trump.

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Russia's Cyber Profile

A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma: an analysis of Russia’s cyber profile

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In today’s geopolitical arena, battles are increasingly fought with bits instead of bullets, and bots instead of soldiers. While these covert operations largely remain behind the scenes, the result is often felt as an aftershock by the public. The list of casualties, which includes some of the biggest names in financial services, technology, defence and government, is growing exponentially. And to further blur the already murky waters surrounding the issue of attribution in cyber warfare, nation state actors aiming to achieve a degree of deniability now often employ proxies to engage in cyber espionage campaigns.

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